Mayor Corby said they’re working with Nazareth to contain a coronavirus cluster. Corby admits it’s causing some uneasiness in the community.

“There was an incident a week ago where some Nazareth kids were running through the village and I had a couple of calls that they were not respecting social distance,” Corby said.

According to the college’s coronavirus tracking site, there have been 34 cases in total since Sept. 26 with at least 19 of those cases linked to one event. He said as of now students who not in quarantine are still allowed to enter the village, but the school is monitoring who comes in and who comes out.

“What we’ve heard is that the students that did test positive are restricted so I don’t think at this point we would take a measure like that but again it just depends on how things change and if we do see another surge then we probably would put other restrictions in place,” Corby said.

Mayor Corby said he’ll remain in constant communication with the college and if it continues to spread they will take further action. In the meantime, he’s leaving this message to the whole community.

“I think the message to students is it’s not about you. It’s the risk that you create for other people because we have like any community we have people of all ages all health conditions here and each of us individually as part of being an adult is taking on the responsibility to know that your behavior affects others,” Corby said. 

News10NBC did reach out to Nazareth for an update. The college said it wouldn’t be offering further comment Monday but said we should get an update in the next two weeks.

“I was a bit concerned that it might be a predictor of the uptick of what’s going to be happening as we go into cold and flu season and students thinking they’re in a safe bubble and not keeping the distance they need to,” Wendy Kapton said.

Kapton walks along the canal often with her daughter she said she’s concerned it could spread into the village and surrounding towns. 

“They are going to get loved ones ill and they aren’t as resilient as younger people,” Kapton said.

It’s a sentiment other residents shared.

“We have to trust that people follow protocols that’s masking social distancing and isolating, if that doesn’t happen were all at risk,” John Maxwell said. 

Maxwell is a teacher in Fairport and visits the village often, he said he wants everyone to follow the rules so there’s less of a risk.

“My risks are keeping everyone safe, making sure our students get a solid education and trusting that everyone else does the same,” Maxwell said. 

However, not everyone is worried about the cluster, saying it was bound to happen eventually somewhere.

“To me, that number is not outstandingly high to me it’s not overly concerning. You know I’m hopeful people will continue to be responsible and that the numbers will go back down, that’s my hope,” Pittsford resident Dave Leitner said.



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