The ever-changing weekly list this week covered 30 counties the state said had reached two or more bench marks that indicate the virus is spreading there.

The warning list came as the state announced 2,145 newly diagnosed cases of coronavirus and 32 additional deaths of people with COVID-19 on Friday, bringing the total number of known infections in Illinois to 257,788 and the statewide death toll to 8,273 since the start of the pandemic.

Citywide, 84.2% of students at district schools attended a remote learning class on Tuesday, increasing to 88.5% on Wednesday and 90.2% on Thursday, according to data released Friday.

In a letter released Thursday, superintendent Joylynn Pruitt-Adams said she had “deep concern” about the report, saying a number of the cases can be traced to a recent large social gathering.

Here’s what’s happening Friday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

1:38 p.m.: DuPage among 30 counties on Illinois’ latest coronavirus warning list

DuPage County is on Illinois’ latest list of counties that have reached a “warning level” for a resurgence of COVID-19.

The ever-changing weekly list this week covered 30 counties the state said had reached two or more bench marks that indicate the virus is spreading there.

The warning list came as the state announced 2,145 newly diagnosed cases of coronavirus and 32 additional deaths of people with COVID-19 on Friday.

Speaking Friday morning at an unrelated news conference in Chicago, Gov. J.B. Pritzker noted that the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks comes as Illinois and the U.S. are grappling with “yet another tragedy” — a pandemic that has killed more than 190,000 Americans, including 8,273 in Illinois. Nearly 3,000 died in the 9/11 attacks.

“I believe the lessons of community and of resilience that echoed through the United States in the aftermath of 9/11 ought to guide us today as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic,” Pritzker said.

12:12 p.m.: CPS first-day attendance down from last year as remote learning begins; some schools see fewer than 50% of students participate

Attendance for the first day of Chicago Public Schools’ remote fall quarter varied from a low below 42% to a high of 100% at each of more than 500 district-run schools.

Citywide, 84.2% of students at district schools attended a remote learning class on Tuesday, increasing to 88.5% on Wednesday and 90.2% on Thursday, according to data released Friday.

The day-one numbers are 10 percentage points lower than the first day of school last year, before the COVID-19 pandemic prompted the move to remote learning and 94.2% of students were marked in attendance. Between the three prior school years, first-day attendance ranged from 93.9% to 94.7%.

12:07 p.m.: 2,145 new known cases and 32 more deaths reported

Illinois health officials Friday announced 2,145 new known cases of COVID-19 and 32 additional fatalities, bringing the total number of known infections in Illinois to 257,788 and the statewide death toll to 8,273 since the start of the pandemic.

11:04 a.m.: Coronavirus updates: Daily US deaths decline, but trend may reverse in fall

The number of daily U.S. deaths from the coronavirus is declining again after peaking in early August, but scientists warn that a new bout with the disease this fall could claim more lives.

The arrival of cooler weather and the likelihood of more indoor gatherings will add to the importance of everyday safety precautions, experts say.

“We have to change the way we live until we have a vaccine,” said Ali Mokdad, professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. In other words: Wear a mask. Stay home. Wash your hands.

The U.S. has seen two distinct peaks in daily deaths. The nation’s summertime surge crested at about half the size of the first deadly wave in April.

10:58 a.m.: They’re still working. They’re still healthy. But they’re still scared. What the past six months have been like for essential workers.

When the streets emptied of people six months ago, a new class of heroes emerged.

They were the drivers, grocery clerks, janitors and others who braved the early unease of the pandemic to show up for work, exempt from the state’s stay-at-home order because they were deemed too important.

The Tribune profiled five essential workers in March just as the state’s shutdown set in. Six months later, all remain at their jobs, with perspectives to share about experiencing the pandemic outside the safety of their homes.

10:46 a.m.: Schools that are mostly Black, Latino favor starting online, according to new study

Districts where the vast majority of students are white are more than three times as likely as school districts that enroll mostly students of color to be open for some in-person learning, according to an analysis conducted by The Associated Press and Chalkbeat.

While that stark divide often reflects the preferences of parents, it’s one that could further exacerbate inequities in education.

In every state, the AP and Chalkbeat surveyed the largest school districts in each of four categories set by the National Center for Education Statistics: urban, suburban, town and rural.

8:59 a.m.: 24 Oak Park and River Forest High School students test positive for COVID-19, officials say

The Oak Park Department of Public Health has reported at least 24 Oak Park and River Forest High School students tested positive for COVID-19 between Aug. 15 and Sept. 9.

In a letter released Thursday, superintendent Joylynn Pruitt-Adams said she had “deep concern” about the report, saying a number of the cases can be traced to a recent large social gathering.

“We have received information from both parents and students that a large indoor gathering of students recently was held at a local home, where mask-wearing and social-distancing were not observed,” Pruitt-Adams said. “A significant number of positive cases are believed to have resulted from the event.”

8:58 a.m.: Will airlines get more aid? Time is running out, unions warn. 40,000 workers face furloughs or layoffs.

A couple of hundred flight attendants and pilots rallied this week on Capitol Hill and tweeted at lawmakers, asking them for $25 billion in additional federal funds to prevent airline furloughs next month.

More than half of Congress is on record as supporting the request by airlines and their unions, and President Donald Trump says he wants to help an industry that has been devastated by the pandemic.

Any chance that Washington will give airlines more money soon hinges on Congress and the White House approving a comprehensive coronavirus relief package — there won’t be a plan that only helps airlines.

8:44 a.m.: Will County chambers try, unsuccessfully, to get restaurant restrictions eased

Despite efforts by area chambers of commerce, restaurants and bars in Will County will remain under restrictions barring any indoor service until the area’s COVID-19 positivity rates improve.

Mitigations for the state’s Region 7, which includes Will and Kankakee counties, were announced Aug. 25 when the region’s positivity rate was 8.4%.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker noted Thursday the region’s positivity rates appear to be on a downward trend. According to the Illinois Department of Public Health’s website, the latest information recorded shows Region 7 with a positivity rate of 7.5% on Monday. On Sept. 1, the recorded positivity rate was 8.1%, according to the public health website.

7 a.m.: Pritzker to announce jobs programs in Chicago

Following up on an announcement made Thursday in Rockford, Illinois Gov. J.B. was scheduled Friday to join local leaders to announce investments to expand job opportunities in Chicago for those who have become unemployed due to the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to a news release.

Pritzker was expected to announce the programs at Cara Chicago on the West Side late Friday morning.

6 a.m.: Disinformation scams are becoming more aggressive as Election Day nears

One of the most widespread challenges facing modern elections is false information. In Illinois, officials say misinformation and disinformation schemes are getting more aggressive.

“As we get closer to Election Day, I think we’re going to have more and more misinformation schemes,” said Marisel Hernandez, chairwoman of the Chicago Board of Elections. “But we’re determined to be ahead of the curve and be out there letting voters know what is correct and what isn’t.”

With many more people planning to vote by mail because of the coronavirus pandemic, the Tribune has fact-checked reported scams circulating in Illinois.

5 a.m.: Chicago-area renters are still being pushed out of their homes with threats of lockouts and notices on doors, despite COVID-19 eviction moratorium

Before the pandemic, Jaime Espinoza, 28, was making ends meet with DJ and security jobs. Working under the moniker DJ WrcksIt for eight years, the Hillside resident went from clearing almost $50,000 in 2019 to, this year, hosting $5 open mic showcases in Melrose Park to cover his $850 monthly rent, car payment and groceries.

After informing his landlord that he would have trouble paying rent in April, Espinoza started receiving notices on his door saying he had days to come current. When the landlord told him they would change the locks, he asked his family for money to keep him afloat. But he still owes thousands of dollars in back rent.

Changing the locks would be an illegal lockout, and the state’s moratorium on evictions means Espinoza can’t be forced from his home until the crisis spurred by the coronavirus has passed.

But his experience is all too familiar for some Illinois renters, who find themselves in housing limbo as they struggle to pay rent due to the financial constraints brought on by COVID-19. And despite Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s latest extension on the statewide eviction moratorium (currently set to expire Sept. 19) and a federal halt on some evictions through 2020, some people continue to receive warnings of evictions that can seem like the real thing.

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