MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Saturday’s coronavirus update from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) shows an increase in the seven-day average of daily new cases, as well as an increase in the seven-day average for daily deaths.

According to the DHS, another 3,046 people tested positive for the novel coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, on Saturday. That brings the total amount of people who have ever tested positive in Wisconsin to 505,058.

The DHS says out of the 8,614 test results that came back positive Saturday the 3,046 new confirmed cases make up 35.36% of all test results. The other 5,568 people who were tested for the first time came back negative. A total of 2,396,106 people have tested negative for the virus since testing began.

The seven-day average for new cases per day increased from 2,715 to 2,996 on Saturday.

State health officials also reported another 36 new deaths from COVID-19 Saturday. This comes after two consecutive days of 40 deaths. Earlier this week, the state reported 95 deaths in a single day. The seven-day average for deaths attributed to COVID-19 is now at 41. On Friday, that figure was at 36.

The death rate continues to hold steady at 1.02% for a fourth straight day. New deaths were reported by the state in Calumet, Chippewa, Dane, Eau Claire, Green Lake, Kenosha, Manitowoc, Milwaukee, Racine, Sawyer, Shawano, Vilas, Washington, Waukesha and Waushara Counties.

Meanwhile, case numbers were revised by the state in Kewaunee County.

County-by-county cases and deaths are later in this article.

To date, a total of 2,901,164 people have been tested for the COVID-19 virus in Wisconsin.

Saturday’s numbers were delayed in being released due to technical difficulties with the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance (WEDSS) system.

Hospitalizations

The DHS reported 120 more COVID-19 hospitalizations since Friday, causing the 7-day average to jump to 125 patients a day in the past week.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported Saturday there were 1,002 COVID-19 patients hospitalized, including 222 in intensive care. Both numbers have decreased for the past two days. The numbers take deaths, discharges and new admissions into account.

As of Saturday, the alternate care facility at State Fair Park wasn’t handling any overflow patients for hospitals in the state, and, also didn’t have any people receiving outpatient Bamlanivimab infusion therapy. State health officials say the field hospital has treated 170 people since it was established in October to take patients who are close to discharge but still need some care, such as oxygen treatments.

Hospital Readiness

In Saturday’s update, the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported 266 ICU beds (18.14%) and 2,205 of all types of medical beds (19.73%) — ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation — were open in the state’s 134 hospitals. These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals had 19 ICU beds (18.26%) and 106 medical beds total (12.42%) open among them for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 34 ICU beds (16.42%) and 229 of all medical beds (23.95%) open for people in seven counties.

Testing

In addition to the official daily numbers, the DHS reports results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By these measures, the DHS received 18,092 results Friday, including 1,722 that were positive, and the 7-day positivity rate declined for a third day and is now 10.5%. These results are very preliminary and always at least a day behind the official DHS daily summary; they include negative tests undergoing further review and take about two weeks to finalize. We emphasize that reporting one result per person rather than multiple tests is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

Vaccinations

In a health briefing Thursday, Health Secretary-designee Andrea Palm said about 105,000 people received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 5,000 of those also received their second dose. The state is averaging about 4,773 vaccinations per day since the first shots were given on December 15.

Palm reiterated that everyone in Wisconsin who wants to be vaccinated will get the vaccine, but it may take several months. Wisconsin is still in “Phase 1A” of the vaccinations, focusing on health care workers and the residents and staff at nursing homes and senior living facilities. Some EMS crews and essential frontline workers are also getting the vaccine. Palm emphasized the need to wear face masks and keep a social distance, saying, “It will be months before we can return to normal habits.”

SATURDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • · Adams – 1,376 cases (+5) (11 deaths)
  • · Ashland – 1,054 cases (+10) (16 deaths)
  • · Barron – 4,705 cases (+26) (58 deaths)
  • · Bayfield – 960 cases (+4) (18 deaths)
  • · Brown – 27,466 cases (+155) (168 deaths)
  • · Buffalo – 1,078 cases (+14) (7 deaths)
  • · Burnett – 1,032 cases (+8) (21 deaths)
  • · Calumet – 4,876 cases (+29) (37 deaths) (+1)
  • · Chippewa – 6,227 cases (+51) (70 deaths) (+3)
  • · Clark – 2,914 cases (+7) (54 deaths)
  • · Columbia – 4,445 cases (+35) (33 deaths)
  • · Crawford – 1,588 cases (+1) (13 deaths)
  • · Dane – 35,189 cases (+181) (211 deaths) (+8)
  • · Dodge – 10,676 cases (+39) (126 deaths)
  • · Door – 2,158 cases (+14) (15 deaths)
  • · Douglas – 3,254 cases (+23) (17 deaths)
  • · Dunn – 3,698 cases (+10) (25 deaths)
  • · Eau Claire – 9,720 cases (+38) (87 deaths) (+3)
  • · Florence – 408 cases (12 deaths)
  • · Fond du Lac – 10,913 cases (+91) (71 deaths)
  • · Forest – 886 cases (22 deaths)
  • · Grant – 4,248 cases (+10) (77 deaths)
  • · Green – 2,444 cases (+21) (10 deaths)
  • · Green Lake – 1,423 cases (+3) (14 deaths) (+1)
  • · Iowa – 1,723 cases (+4) (8 deaths)
  • · Iron – 434 cases (+1) (18 deaths)
  • · Jackson – 2,463 cases (+18) (18 deaths)
  • · Jefferson – 7,000 cases (+32) (60 deaths)
  • · Juneau – 2,657 cases (+26) (11 deaths)
  • · Kenosha – 13,069 cases (+138) (241 deaths) (+4)
  • · Kewaunee – 2,166 cases (State revised, decrease of 465) (24 deaths)
  • · La Crosse – 10,691 cases (+98) (63 deaths)
  • · Lafayette – 1,275 cases (+5) (5 deaths)
  • · Langlade – 1,839 cases (+6) (30 deaths)
  • · Lincoln – 2,633 cases (+41) (49 deaths)
  • · Manitowoc – 6,424 cases (+56) (55 deaths) (+1)
  • · Marathon – 12,492 cases (+88) (161 deaths)
  • · Marinette – 3,668 cases (+35) (51 deaths)
  • · Marquette – 1,192 cases (+2) (20 deaths)
  • · Menominee – 749 cases (+2) (10 deaths)
  • · Milwaukee – 88,648 (+404) (994 deaths) (+1)
  • · Monroe – 3,675 cases (+30) (25 deaths)
  • · Oconto – 3,935 cases (+15) (41 deaths)
  • · Oneida – 2,923 cases (+14) (47 deaths)
  • · Outagamie – 17,006 cases (+152) (164 deaths)
  • · Ozaukee – 6,688 cases (+65) (58 deaths)
  • · Pepin – 713 cases (+8) (6 deaths)
  • · Pierce – 3,089 cases (+23) (30 deaths)
  • · Polk – 3,257 cases (+19) (29 deaths)
  • · Portage – 5,786 cases (+29) (54 deaths)
  • · Price – 980 cases (+5) (6 deaths)
  • · Racine – 18,555 cases (+117) (268 deaths) (+2)
  • · Richland – 1,166 cases (+13) (13 deaths)
  • · Rock – 12,764 cases (+94) (122 deaths)
  • · Rusk – 1,156 cases (+9) (14 deaths)
  • · Sauk – 4,704 cases (+27) (31 deaths)
  • · Sawyer – 1,290 cases (+10) (17 deaths) (+1)
  • · Shawano – 4,309 cases (+15) (60 deaths) (+2)
  • · Sheboygan – 11,811 cases (+15) (96 deaths)
  • · St. Croix – 5,660 cases (+20) (32 deaths)
  • · Taylor – 1,645 cases (+10) (14 deaths)
  • · Trempealeau – 3,102 cases (+19) (30 deaths)
  • · Vernon – 1,626 cases (+13) (31 deaths)
  • · Vilas – 1,703 cases (+24) (27 deaths) (+6)
  • · Walworth – 8,051 cases (+33) (105 deaths)
  • · Washburn – 1,093 cases (+11) (15 deaths)
  • · Washington – 12,368 cases (+106) (103 deaths) (+1)
  • · Waukesha – 36,290 cases (+249) (373 deaths) (+1)
  • · Waupaca – 4,301 cases (+32) (100 deaths)
  • · Waushara – 1,953 cases (+7) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • · Winnebago – 15,660 cases (+59) (159 deaths)
  • ·  Wood – 5,938 cases (+62) (54 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger – 210 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Baraga – 476 cases (29 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 647 cases (+5) (13 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,544 cases (+6) (60 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 2,047 cases (+2) (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 737 cases (+6) (16 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,734 cases (+21) (27 deaths)
  • Iron – 792 cases (+3) (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 83 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Luce – 127 cases
  • Mackinac – 269 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Marquette – 3,253 cases (+12) (51 deaths)
  • Menominee – 1,530 cases (+2) (30 deaths) (+3)
  • Ontonagon – 282 cases (15 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 220 cases (+1) (3 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

COVID-19 Home Testing

Gov. Tony Evers announced at-home COVID-19 testing kits will be made available — for free — to anyone who wants them. A person can test themselves or family members, even if they don’t have symptoms, then send it to a lab for testing. The Vault Medical Services kit is the first saliva test to get emergency-use authorization from the FDA and normally costs $119. CLICK HERE for details and a link to request a test kit.

COVID-19 Vaccine

As of January 8, the state says 123,402 COVID-19 vaccines out of the 266,675 vaccines shipped have been administered. The state started giving out the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 14th, with 83,302 of them being administered so far. Moderna vaccinations started Dec. 22nd, and 40,100 of them have been administered. The state is updating vaccine information at dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine.htm.

RELATED: Wisconsin starts vaccinating residents, staff in long-term care facilities with help of CVS Health

Wisconsin has also launched a COVID-19 vaccine data page that tracks the number of shots given out and shipped to the state. TRACK STATEWIDE VACCINE DATA HERE: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm

RELATED: Wisconsin launches COVID vaccine data page

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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